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Navy Seals believed to have died on an anti-Huthi mission

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Off the coast of Somalia, on January 11, commandos were embarking aboard a ship when the event happened.

Media accounts state that one was swept away and that the second entered the room in accordance with protocol after them.

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According to US Central Command, efforts are currently underway to retrieve the dead.

Central Command (Centcom) chief Gen. Michael Erik Kurilla said, “We mourn the loss of our two Naval Special Warfare warriors, and we will forever honor their sacrifice and example.”

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With the assistance of oceanographers and meteorologists, air and naval units from the US, Japan, and Spain searched a region covering more than 21,000 sq miles (54,389 sq km) for ten days in an attempt to locate the commandos.

Members of a specialized maritime military unit, Navy Seals are tasked with conducting covert operations and reconnaissance.

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The weapons were found on an unflagged how, a traditional sailing ship,  that was being boarded by the first Seal during the night mission when they were washed into rough waters, military officials told the Associated Press.

Then, following training protocol, the second into the water to attempt to save the first.

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As stated by US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin, “our hearts are with” the families of the “two brave Navy Seals”.

“Today, the entire Department is grieving together. We appreciate everyone who put forth great effort in trying to locate and save them,” he posted on X.

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Parts for air defense systems and warheads for anti-ship cruise and medium-range ballistic missiles from the Houthi were among the materials recovered, according to a statement made by Centcom last week.

It further stated that preliminary examination revealed the parts belonged to missiles that the Houthis, who receive support from Iran, had been using to hit ships passing through the Red Sea lately.

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It is deemed against international law and a 2015 United Nations Security Resolution to provide, sell, or transfer weapons to the Houthis.

Hundreds of cargo ships and tankers have been redirected around the southern tip of Africa in order to avoid the Houthi attacks, which have targeted dozens of vessels.

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The Houthis, who back Hamas, assert that since the beginning of the Gaza War, they are solely aiming at ships that have ties to Israel. Some of the ships they have struck, meanwhile, have not been directly linked to Israel.

 

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Additionally, they have started attacking ships connected to the United States and the United Kingdom after those two nations used air power to hit Houthi strongholds in Yemen as payback for Red Sea attacks. The group is in charge of the Red Sea coast, the nation’s capital, Sanaa, and the northern region.

The US and the UK assert that they are working to safeguard the international commerce channel rather than pursuing a confrontation with the Houthis.

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